6 Things you should know about new anti-corruption committee in judiciary

6 Things you should know about new anti-corruption committee in judiciary

Six things you should know about new anti-corruption committee in judiciary

Last week, the judiciary established a committee that will be responsible for fighting corruption in the judicial system.

Launched on Thursday, April 28, the committee will have sub-committees that will cover all levels of courts, monitoring their operations and reporting any tendencies of corruption.

Here are 6 things to know about the committee’s structure, functions and how its members are appointed.

1. It comprises 5 sub-committees

The anti-corruption committee is led by a board of five people, four of whom are appointed by the Chief Justice, while one will be an official of the Inspectorate of Courts.

Under the board are different anti-corruption sub-committees, including an anti-corruption committee at the level of the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal, an anti-corruption committee at the High Court, Judiciary Headquarters, and the courts within this jurisdiction.

It also comprises an anti-corruption committee at the level of each chamber of the High Court and the courts operating under the High Court’s jurisdiction, as well as an anti-corruption committee at the level of the Commercial High Court and the Commercial Court.

2. How members of the committee are appointed

The anti-corruption committee at the level of the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal consists of a Judge and a Registrar of the Supreme Court appointed by the Chief Justice, a Judge and a Registrar of the Court of Appeal appointed by the President of the Court of Appeal, a worker of the Supreme Court’s Registry appointed by the Chief Registrar of the Supreme Court; as well as an employee representing other employees of the judiciary appointed by the Chief Inspector of courts.

The anti-corruption committee at the level of the High Court and the courts operating under its jurisdiction is made up of a Judge or Registrar representing the High Court, each intermediate court and each primary court operating in that jurisdiction. They are appointed by the President of the Court they are representing and an employee of the Registry of the Supreme Court appointed by the Registrar of the Supreme Court.

The anti-corruption committee at the level of each High Court Chamber consists of a Judge or Registrar representing the High Court Chamber, as well as those representing each High Court and each Primary Court operating in that jurisdiction. These are appointed by the President of the court they are representing and an employee of the Registry of the Supreme Court appointed by the Chief Registrar of the Supreme Court.

The anti-corruption committee at the level of the High Court of Commerce and the Commercial Court consists of a Judge and a Registrar of the High Court of Commerce by the court’s president.

It also includes a Judge and a Registrar of the Commercial Court, appointed by the President of the Commercial Court, and employee of the Registry of the Supreme Court appointed by the Chief Registrar of the Supreme Court.

3. Criteria for appointing a person to sit on the committee

To be appointed a member of the anti-corruption committee in the courts, you should be a person of integrity, having the will and ability to analyse and identify gaps that may lead to corruption, and you must have the ability to advise on the right measures to prevent and combat corruption.

4. Responsibilities of the anti-corruption committee

The committee will cover all levels of courts, monitoring their operations and reporting any tendencies of corruption, in addition to putting in place and implementing specific measures for closing loopholes that make the courts prone to corruption.

It will also be responsible for asking the Inspectorate of Courts to investigate the workers who are suspected of taking part in corruption, but it will also render advice to court employees in terms of ethical practices, among other things.

5. Quarterly meetings will be held

The committees that comprise the anti-corruption committee will hold quarterly meetings to discuss their work.

They also convene an extraordinary meeting at any time at the request of their presidents.

6. Sub-committees must submit quarterly reports to the board

Each quarter, the anti-corruption committees at different court levels will have to submit an action report to the President of the board

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